Speak About:

Present

Past

Past to Present

Future

Abilities - Responsibilities

Asking Questions

Choosing the Right Phrase

Combining Verbs

Explaining Ideas

Describing Your World

Complex Ideas

Relating Ideas, People, Objects

Speaking about Objects

Wondering about Situations

Helping Hints for the Present

Auxiliary Verbs Used with Present Tenses

Knowledge of auxiliary verbs used in various tenses is the key to correct tense conjugation. Here is a review of auxiliary verbs used in present tenses:

Present Simple:

Use 'do / does' in questions and negative statements to express a routine or habitual action. Use no auxiliary verb in the positive form.

Example:

The futures market doesn't open for operations on federal holidays.

How often do you check your credit score in a year?

BUT:

I transfer funds to my savings account several times a week.

The savings bank usually sends checks out on Tuesday.

Present Continuous:

Use 'am / is / are' in the present tense for the positive, negative and question forms in the present continuous tense to express something that is happening at the current moment, or around the present moment in time.

Example:

The supermarket is giving very good discounted rates when you purchase more than 10 items worth $20.

They are trying to keep the account from being in the red.

Present Simple Passive:

Use the verb 'am / is / are' in the present for positive, negative and question in the present simple passive to express a present passive operation. Remember that the passive takes the participle form of the principal verb.

Example:

The balance sheet is written in Atlanta.

The pension fund is contributed to every week.

Present Perfect:

Use 'have / has' in the present for the positive, negative and question forms for the present perfect tense to express something that has happened up to the present moment in time, or something which has occurred at an unspecified moment in the past.

Example:

We have just been given the settlement price.

I've just cast my proxy vote for my large-cap mutual fund.

Present Perfect Continuous:

Use the verb 'have been / has been' in the present perfect for the positive, negative and question forms for the present perfect tense to express the duration of something that has been happening up to the present moment in time.

Example:

I've been typing a note for all bank workers about the provision of uniforms since nine this morning.

I've been writing a promissory note to pay a definite sum of money to the payee since two this afternoon.